New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards
May 1996

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Science Standards And Progress Indicators
Standard 5.3:
All Students Will Develop An Understanding Of How People Of Various Cultures Have Contributed To The Advancement Of Science And Technology, And How Major Discoveries And Events Have Advanced Science And Technology

Descriptive Statement: Science is a human endeavor involving successes and failures, trials and tribulations. Students should know that many people of all cultures have contributed to our understanding of science and that science has a rich and fascinating history. This standard encourages students to learn about the people and events that have shaped or revolutionized important scientific theories and concepts.

Cumulative Progress Indicators

By the end of Grade 4, students:

1.

Hear, read, write, and talk about scientists and inventors in historical context.

2.

Recognize that scientific ideas and knowledge have come from men and women of all cultures.

Building upon knowledge and skills gained in the preceding grades, by the end of Grade 8, students:

3.

Recognize that scientific theories emerge over time, depend on the contributions of many people, and reflect the social and political climate of their time.

4.

Develop a time line of major events and people in the history of science, in conjunction with other world events.

5.

Trace the historical origin of important scientific developments such as atomic theory, genetics, plate tectonics, etc., showing how scientific theories emerge, are tested, and can be replaced or modified in light of new information and improved investigative techniques.

Building upon knowledge and skills gained in the preceding grades, by the end of Grade 12, students:

6.

Recognize the role of the scientific community in responding to changing social and political conditions.

7.

Examine the lives and contributions of important scientists and engineers who effected major breakthroughs in our understanding of the natural world.

 

 

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