New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards
May 1996

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Social Studies Standards And Progress Indicators
Standard 6.3:
All Students Will Acquire Historical Understanding Of Political And Diplomatic Ideas, Forces, And Institutions Throughout The History Of New Jersey, The United States, And The World

Descriptive Statement: History is the study of the human past: society's memory of where it has been, what it values, and how decisions of the past have contributed to present conditions. History deals with chronological sequences, continuity and change, the multiple causes and effects of historical phenomena, and changing interpretations of the past. Historical inquiry enables students to evaluate evidence and analyze events, fostering informed decision-making and thoughtful reflection.

In order to ensure that students share a common core of knowledge, by the end of their school experience students of United States history should have studied all five of the following major periods in history:

  • The Colonial Period (to 1763)
  • The Revolution and Early National Period (to 1820)
  • The Age of Civil War and Reconstruction (to 1870)
  • Industrial America and the Era of World Wars (to 1945)
  • The Modern Age

In addition, students of World History should have studied all seven of the following World History Periods:

  • Prehistory (to 2000 BC)
  • The Ancient World (to 500 BC)
  • The World of Hemispheric Interactions and the "Middle Ages" (to 1400)
  • The Age of Global Encounters (to 1700)
  • The Age of Revolutions (to 1850)
  • The Age of Imperialism and World War (to 1950)
  • The Modern World

School districts are encouraged to define the balance among materials from Western, Asian, African, and other world cultures materials in each of these periods. Furthermore, several suggested themes are included among the history standards to enhance and enrich the study of history.

Cumulative Progress Indicators

By the end of Grade 4, students:

1.

Apply the concepts of cause, effect, and consequences to historical events.

2.

Analyze varying viewpoints of individuals and groups at turning points throughout history.

3.

Identify and explain how events and changes occurred in significant historical periods.

4.

Explain issues, standards, and conflicts related to universal human rights

Building upon knowledge and skills gained in the preceding grades, by the end of Grade 8, students:

5.

Explain relationships between cause, effect, and consequences, in order to understand significant historical events.

6.

Assess positions of proponents and opponents at turning points throughout history.

7.

Analyze how events and changes occurred in significant historical periods.

8.

Understand issues, standards, and conflicts related to universal human rights.

Building upon knowledge and skills gained in the preceding grades, by the end of Grade 12, students:

9.

Understand the complexity of historical causation.

10.

Analyze how and why different historians may weigh causal factors differently, and why historical interpretations change over time.

11.

Compare and contrast divergent interpretations of historical turning points, using available evidence.

12.

Understand the views of people of other times and places regarding the issues they have faced.

13.

Synthesize historical facts and interpretations to reach personal conclusions about significant historical events.

14.

Analyze and formulate policy statements demonstrating an understanding of issues, standards, and conflicts related to universal human rights.

Themes

By the end of their school years, students should have studied, within the periods outlined above, a designated number of the following specific themes:

The history of different political systems, with special attention to democracy; the history of relations among different political groups and entities; the history of warfare; the history of political leadership.

 

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