New Jersey
World Languages Curriculum Framework

Arts Framework Cover

NEW JERSEY STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION - WINTER 1999

C U R R I C U L U M
F R A M E W O R K

NEW JERSEY
WORLD LANGUAGES
CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
A Document in Support of the
Core Curriculum Content Standards
for World Languages


CHRISTINE TODD WHITMAN
Governor


LEO KLAGHOLZ
Commissioner of Education


ELLEN M. SCHECHTER
Assistant Commissioner
Division of Academic and Career Standards


JAY DOOLAN
Director
Office of Standards and Professional Development


JANIS JENSEN
World Languages Coordinator


IRIS NAGLER
Framework Project Coordinator

January 1999
PTM #1500.48


Permission is granted to duplicate this document for educational purposes.
Please acknowledge the New Jersey Department of Education.


YOUR FEEDBACK IS ENCOURAGED!

The New Jersey World languages Curriculum Framework, like the standards themselves, is intended to be a "living" document, subject to periodic review and revision. Comments and suggestions regarding the Framework should be submitted to the New Jersey State Department of Education (Attention: World Languages Coordinator).


New Jersey State Board of Education


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Cover

Table of Contents

Preface

Vision: A New Beginning for World Languages In New Jersey

Acknowledgements

chap1-4.pdf
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Introduction to the New Jersey World Languages Curriculum Framework

Historical Perspective
Overview and Organization

Chapter 1: RATIONALE FOR THE STUDY OF WORLD LANGUAGES

Benefits of World Language Study
World Languages at the Elementary Level:
The Optimum Starting Point

Chapter 2: THE ESSENTIAL COMPONENTS OF AN EFFECTIVE WORLD LANGUAGE PROGRAM

Language Acquisition for ALI Students
Communicative Proficiency: The Characteristic of Proficiency- Based Instruction
Articulation: The K-12 Continuum
The Student-Centered, Authentic Classroom
The Interdisciplinary Connection
Cross-Content Workplace Readiness and Systems Thinking
Summary of the Essential Components of an Effective
New Jersey World Language Program

Chapter 3: RESTRUCTURING THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

Scheduling and Restructuring the School Day
Staffing Options
Other Models
Instructional Materials
The Role of Technology

Chapter 4:LINKING THE STANDARDS AND FRAMEWORK TO CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

The New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards and Indicators for World Languages
Developing District Curriculum

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Chapter 5: THE IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS

World Languages in the Elementary School
World Languages in the Secondary School
Multiple Entry Points
Choice of Languages
The Classical Languages
The Less Commonly Taught Languages
The Role of Grammar

Chapter 6: RETHINKING ASSESSMENT

A New Paradigm
Key Components of Assessment
Assessment Alternatives
Assessment Rubrics
Local Assessment
State Assessment

Chapter 7: INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES AND STUDENT LEARNING CHARACTERISTICS

Instructional Strategies
Student Learning Characteristics and Learning Styles

Chapter 8: PROFESSIONAL EDUCATORS/ LIFELONG LEARNING

Professional Development
Teacher Preparation

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scenariok-4.pdf
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scenario5-8.pdf
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scenario9-12.pdf
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Chapter 9: THE EFFECT OF THE WORLD LANGUAGES STANDARDS AND FRAMEWORK ON THE NEW JERSEY COMMUNITY

Students
Teachers
Administrators
Parents
Business Community
College and University Programs

Chapter 10: LEARNING SCENARIOS

Introduction to the Learning Scenarios
Description of the Scenario Format
Thematic Grade Level Index
The Scenarios
K-4 Scenarios
5-8 Scenarios
9-12 Scenarios
Thematic Scenarios K-4 through 9-12

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Chapter 11: K-12 WORLD LANGUAGE PROGRAMS IN CURRENT PRACTICE

Springfield, Massachusetts
Culver City, California
Elmhurst, Illinois
Ferndale, Michigan
A K-12 Program in Eastern Connecticut

Model Early Foreign Language Programs 1998 (CAL)

Chapter 12: INSTRUCTIONAL ADAPTATIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH DIVERSE NEEDS

Part One - Adaptations for Students with Disabilities
Introduction
Descriptions of Adaptations
Sample Adaptations
References

Part Two: Adaptations for Exceptionally Able (Gifted) Learners . 215 Introduction
Adaptation Strategies
Types of Adaptations
References

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APPENDICES

Appendix A: ACTFL GUIDELINES

ACTFL Performance Guidelines for K-12 Learners (Figure 1)

Appendix B: ASSESSMENTS

General Information

Assessment Profile (Figure 2)
Ideas for Exhibitions and Projects (Figure 3)
Student Portfolio Artifacts (Figure 4)

Sample Assessment Rubrics

Generic Rubrics for World Language Tasks (Figure 5)
Assessing the Quality of Portfolios (Figure 6)
Rating Scales (Figure 7)
Example of a Holistic Rating Scale (Figure 7A)
Example of an Analytic Rating Scale (Figure 7B)
Rubrics for Assessment of American Sign Language (Figure 8)
Expressive Skills (Figure 8A)
Receptive Skills (Figure 8B)
Oral Activity Self-Evaluation (Figure 9)
Oral Report Assessment (Figure 10)
Story Evaluation (Figure 11.
Expressing a Point of View (Figure 12)
Story Retelling Checklist: Self-Assessment (Figure 13)

Sample District and State Assessment Models (Figures 14-23)

Appendix C: Methodology for Innovative Instruction in K-12 World Language Programs

Natural Approach (Figure 24)
Password/Language Ladders (Figure 25)
Gouin Series (Figure 26)
Dialogue Journals (Figure 27)
Total Physical Response (TPR) (Figure 28)
TPR Storytelling (Figure 29)
Interviews (Figure 30)
Cloze (Figure 31)
Continuums (Figure 32)
Interactive Language Tasks (Figure 33)
Cultural Presentations (Figure 34)
The Learning Cycle (Figure 35)
Read and Retell (Figure 36)
Literature, History, and Storytelling (Figure 37)
Cooperative Learning (Figure 38)
Brainstorming (Figure 39)
Problem Solving (Figure 40)
Reflective Thinking (Figure 41)
Field Experience (Figure 42)
Free Writing (Figure 43)

Appendix D: Instructional Strategies

Strategies for Students with Diverse Talents
Planning for Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom (Figure 44)
Multiple Intelligences Grid of Ideas (Figure 45)Planning Model Using Bloom's Taxonomy (Figure 46)
World Languages and Bloom's Taxonomy (Figure 47)

Strategies for Exceptionally Able (Gifted) Students

Strategies for Exceptionally Able Students (Figure 48)

Strategies for Students with Specific Learning Needs

Considerations for Meeting Specific Learning
Needs in Skill and Instructional Areas (Figure 49)

Appendix E: Graphic Organizers (Figures 50-58)

Appendix F: Key Terms for Teacher Preparation

Model Methods Course: Elementary Level (Figure 59)
Model Methods Course: Secondary Level (Figure 60)

Appendix G: Cross-Content Workplace Readiness and Systems Thinking

Illustrations of the Interdisciplinary, Systems Thinking Approach

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GLOSSARY

REFERENCES

TEACHER RESOURCES