NJDOE News

Contact: Richard Vespucci
For Release: April 26, 2001

Teachers of Students with Limited English Proficiency
Have Two Professional Development Opportunities in May

Bilingual and English as a Second Language teachers from throughout New Jersey will gather next month for a two-day conference designed to develop the knowledge and skills they need to help students master the English language. These teachers will have a similar opportunity to enhance their skills later in May at regional workshops sponsored by the Department of Education.

The two-day conference on May 15-16 is sponsored by the state’s professional association of English as a Second Language and bilingual teachers, known as New Jersey Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages / New Jersey Bilingual Educators (NJTESOL/NJBE).

The conference will feature recognized experts in the field of bilingual and English as a Second Language education and will present workshops on topics relevant to helping English language learners become proficient in English and meet the Core Curriculum Content Standards.

A second professional development opportunity for bilingual and English as a Second Language teachers will be held statewide May 21-23. A workshop, entitled Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners in Mainstream Classrooms, is sponsored by the Department of Education’s Office of Bilingual Education and Equity Issues.

Workshop topics include:

  • Introduction to the key principles of second language acquisition;
  • Guidelines for "sheltering" English language learners in mainstream settings;
  • Sample applications of best practices for English language learners; and
  • Transferring best practices to the classroom.

The workshop will be presented for the northern region of the state at Program Review Improvement Center-Central in Edison, on May 21; for the central region also at Program Review Improvement Center-Central on May 22; and for the southern region of the state at Program Review Improvement Center-South in Sewell, on May 23.

New Jersey has one of the largest numbers of immigrants of any state. During the last 13 years, the percentage of students who are limited English proficient has increased by 56 percent to a total of 52,000 students. Today, more than 160 languages are spoken by students attending New Jersey’s public schools.

For more information about the two-day conference, contact NJTESOL/NJBE at 1-800-95EBESL.

For more information about the regional workshops, contact the Office of Bilingual Education and Equity Issues, 609-292-8777.