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Crossing Guards: Be Seen, Be Safe
(text version)


Protect Yourself! Protect the Children!

“It was raining really hard and visibility wasn’t great, and I saw her step off the curb and I slammed on the brakes... I couldn’t stop, and it went right over her.”

News article quoting an SUV driver who struck and killed a crossing guard.


From 1993 to 2008, 14 NJ adult crossing guards were killed when struck by motor vehicles while at work. An additional 121 adult crossing guards suffered injuries serious enough to require full days away from work as a result of motor vehicle-related accidents.

 

New Jersey state law mandates that crossing guards receive training* and use required personal protective equipment.
*a minimum of two hours of classroom and 20 hours of supervised field training

Required Equipment
Useful Equipment
Don’t Forget!
Resources

Required Equipment

  • ANSI** Class 2 safety vest - ** American National Standards Institute
  • Retroreflective ‘STOP’ paddle
  • Distinctive crossing guard uniform with breast and hat badges with ID#

Useful Equipment

  • Retroreflective gloves
  • Whistle
  • School crossing signs

Don’t Forget!

  • Proceed cautiously into the crosswalk as you alert motorists to stop.
  • Don’t assume a vehicle will stop just because you’re holding a STOP sign.
  • Give vehicles more time to stop during wet and icy conditions.
  • Watch out for passing or turning vehicles.
  • Be aware that larger vehicles require longer distances to stop safely.
  • Hold up your STOP sign until you and the children have cleared the crosswalk.
  • Use hand signals for motorists and verbal signals for children.

Resources

  • New Jersey Statutes Annotated (NJSA) 40A:9-154: Adult school crossing guards; appointment; term; revocation; qualifications; supervision and direction. [pdf 12k] http://nj.gov/health/surv/documents//njac40a9.pdf

  • US DOT, Federal Highway Administration, Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways, 2009 Edition, Part 7. (http://mutcd.fhwa.dot.gov/pdfs/2009/pdf_index.htm) Adopted into NJ Law as per NJSA 39:4-8b.

  • "Street Smart is Street Safe," a 14-minute Crossing Guard Training Video (2007), developed by the Municipal Excess Liability Joint Insurance Fund (www.njmel.org) with the New Jersey Association of Chiefs of Police, the New Jersey Network, the Brain Injury Association of New Jersey, and Commerce Risk Control Services.

  • “Safe Crossings,” Adult School Crossing Guard Training Program (2004), a publication of the Mid-Atlantic Foundation for Safety and Education, American Automobile Association (AAA).

  • Safe Routes to School, Adult School Crossing Guard Guidelines: www.saferoutesinfo.org/guide/crossing_guard/index.cfm

  • American National Standards Institute (ANSI), Standard for High-Visibility Safety Apparel, ANSI 107-1999 Class 2 – including raincoats, jackets, and vests: www.ansi.org.

  • NJ Safe Routes to School Program, NJ Department of Transportation: http://www.state.nj.us/transportation/community/srts.

  • NJ Safe Routes to School Resource Center, Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center (VTC), Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey: http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/srts/index.php.

  • Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI), Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor: http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshstate.htm.

  • Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses, NJ Department of Labor and Workforce Development, in cooperation with the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor: http://lwd.dol.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/content/occsafheasvy_index.html.

  • NJ Department of Health, FACE Report 05NJ090, School Crossing Guard Struck and Killed by a Sport Utility Vehicle: http://nj.gov/health/surv/documents/05nj090.pdf.

The New Jersey Department of Health, in conjunction with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), is currently conducting a research study of fatal work-related injuries. This project, known as FACE (Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation), seeks to identify the factors that contribute to work-related injuries. The FACE study will help in the development and use of improved safety measures for preventing injuries.

This bulletin is also available on the FACE Web site at http://nj.gov/health/surv/face. If you have any comments or questions, or need additional copies of this bulletin, please contact the FACE Project Coordinator at (609) 826-4920 or via e-mail at surveillance@doh.state.nj.us.


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Last Modified: Tuesday, 17-Jul-12 14:10:19