Public Recreational Bathing

image of Coronavirus Disease

 

Under Executive Order No. 153, outdoor swimming pools can open effective at 6:00 a.m. on Monday, June 22, provided that it complies with Executive Directive No. 20-022 issued by the Department of Health.  All public and private beaches, boardwalks, lakes and lakeshore swimming areas are allowed to operate, pursuant Executive Order 143.  Recreational bathing facilities are required to complete the preoperational processes and obtain approval to operate by the Local Health Authority (LHA). Special Exempt Facilities under N.J.A.C. 8:26-1 are required to staff all personnel EXCEPT the lifeguard.  The "Aquatic facilities plan" should be modified to incorporate the COVID-19 Standards. Pool facilities may open for the purpose of lifeguard training and lifeguard swimming lessons prior to June 22.

 

Public Recreational Bathing and Youth Camps Webinar

 

Signs and Posters

Stop the Spread

Face Coverings

Hand Washing

Protect Yourself and Others

 

Additional Resources

NJ COVID Information HUB

NJ Communicable Disease Service- Symptoms

What to Do If You or Someone You Know is Sick

CDC- Quarantine and Isolation

Infection Prevention and Control Training Resource

How to Wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)- (video)

 

 

Swimming and other water-related activities are excellent ways to get the physical activity and health benefits needed for a healthy life. However, they are not risk-free. The Department’s Public Recreational Bathing website provides information for all groups of individuals involved in a healthy and safe swimming experience about how to maximize the health benefits of swimming while minimizing the risk of illness and injury.


News and Updates

7/2/2020

 

6/22/2020

 

6/9/2020

Under Executive Order No. 153, outdoor swimming pools can open effective at 6:00 a.m. on Monday, June 22, provided that it complies with New Jersey COVID-19 Outdoor Pool Standards issued by the Department of Health.  Pool facilities may open for the purpose of lifeguard training and lifeguard swimming lessons prior to June 22.
 

5/22/2020

5/15/2020

All public and private beaches, boardwalks, lakes and lakeshore swimming areas are allowed to operate, pursuant Executive Order 143.  Public Recreational Bathing Facilities are required to complete the preoperational processes including microbiological testing, sanitary survey and preoperational checklist as required by N.J.A.C. 8:26. This includes approval to operate by the Local Health Authority (LHA). "Aquatic facilities plans" are required to be submitted and approved to the LHA and must include mitigation strategies as stated in the Executive Order.  
 

4/30/2020

5/14/2020

4/27/2020

CDC guidance on closing hot tubs/spas for extended periods of time has been updated to address aquatics sector feedback related to hot tubs/spas with a plastered finish, which could end up cracking if drained for a prolonged period of time. 
 
CDC recommendations on reopening hot tubs/spas and other water systems have been updated to clarify that not every public hot tub/spa needs to be tested for Legionella before reopening.

 

4/22/2020

American Red Cross has extended lifeguard and CPR Pro certification from 90 days 120 days.
 
Lifeguard and CPR Pro certificate holders should present the original expired certification and the extension documentation to meet the requirement of certification.
 
Website for guards to get the extension (have an additional cert printed out)
 
 
For Questions:
1-800-RED-CROS
support@redcrosstraining.org

 

4/15/2020

2020 Geomean Form Revised 

4/03/2020

American Red Cross has extended lifeguard and CPR Pro certification for 90 days

4/02/2020

Freshwater Bathing Beach Survey Form provided to LHA who license and/or inspect freshwater bathing facilities - completed form due by MAY 1, 2020

 3/27/2020

Public Recreational Bathing FAQ revised

03/16/2020

New Jersey Communicable Disease Service - Coronavirus (Covid-19) GuidanceWater Transmission and COVID-19

7/10/2019

The Public Health & Food Protection Program (PHFPP) has approved four (4) organizations to provide training for the pool director course. Please review the current recognized certification document for details.

 

 

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Healthy Swimming
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Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB)

Cyanobacteria are a type of bacteria capable of photosynthesis. Although they are not true algae, they were often referred to as “blue‚Äźgreen algae”. A cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) is the name given to the excessive growth, or “bloom”, of cyanobacteria. Adverse health effects from recreational exposure to cyanobacterial cells and cyanotoxins can cause effects ranging from a mild skin rash to serious illness. HABs often occur under suitable environmental conditions of light, temperature, nutrient enrichment, and calm water.  CyanoHABs and their toxins can harm people, animals, aquatic ecosystems, the economy, drinking water supplies, property values, and recreational activities, including swimming and commercial and recreational fishing. 

In New Jersey, HAB monitoring, identification and response activities are conducted through a collaboration of partners including the Department of Environmental Protection’s-Bureau of Freshwater & Biological Monitoring, Department of Health-Public Recreational Bathing Project, and local health authorities who oversee freshwater lakes, rivers and streams. Please access the links below to learn more about HAB’s and New Jersey's coordinated response efforts. 

 

New Jersey Harmful Algal Bloom Main Page

Questions about Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB)

Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) -associated Illness

EPA's Cyanobacterial HABs in Water

 

 

 

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Cooperative Coastal Monitoring Program (CCMP)

The Cooperative Coastal Monitoring Program (CCMP) is a collaborative effort by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP)- Division of Water Monitoring and Standards, Department of Health (DOH)-Public Health and Food Protection Program-Public Recreational Bathing Project and coastal local health authorities (LHA), to assess coastal water quality at public recreational bathing beaches.  Results are communicated to the public and posted online.  Sources of water pollution are subsequently investigated to protect public health and safety.

Water samples are collected from coastal marine waters routinely from mid-May through September.  Samples are analyzed for the fecal indicator bacterium, Enterococcus.  Enterococcus itself is generally not harmful but indicates the possible presence of pathogenic (disease-causing) bacteria, viruses, and protozoans that also live in human and animal digestive systems.

Swimming in water exceeding the standard poses an increased risk of illness, such as gastroenteritis, low grade fevers and infections.  To protect the public’s health, any sample found to exceed the maximum standard concentration of 104 colony forming units of Enterococci per 100 ml of sampled marine waters, requires a swimming advisory and/or closure of the recreational bathing waters. Resampling and a sanitary survey of the area by a licensed health inspector is conducted.

The DEP coordinates CCMP activities, with cooperation of the DOH, to ensure New Jersey’s bathing beaches are safe and clean.  You can find more information about beach water quality sample results, beach status, reports, fact sheets and similar information by visiting the website at: https://www.njbeaches.org/

 

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Frequently Asked Questions
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Public Recreational Bathing Complaints

Complaints regarding public recreational bathing facilities may be directed to the facility's local health department.

 

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Last Reviewed: 7/2/2020