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Department of State

New Jersey State Museum

The Hon. Tahesha Way, Secretary of State

New Jersey State Museum Update

The State Museum is now open regular operating hours. Masks are required for all visitors over the age of 2.

Astronaut Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin

Explore The Museum

Planetarium - Public Programs

Soar into space in the New Jersey State Museum’s Planetarium. Fully upgraded with an Ultra-High Resolution 8K projection system, so your experience is sure to be out of this world! The Planetarium’s spacious, specially designed reclining seats accommodate groups of up to 140, while dynamic and knowledgeable show presenters take the visitor zooming through the solar system with customized star talks.

Public Admission: $10 adult; $5 child (12 years & under) Groups of 15 or more: $5 per person. Advanced ticket sales are not available; box office opens 30 minutes before the first show.

PLEASE NOTE: Planetarium shows are offered to the public Saturday and Sunday only from September-June. Weekday shows are held for school or community groups with advanced reservations. During the summer months, winter break, and spring break, weekday shows are available to the public. Please check the Events/Calendar page for the most current detailed public shows and times.


School/Group Visits:
To schedule a school or community group visit to the Planetarium, call (609) 292-1382 or email njsm.reservations@sos.nj.gov


Happy Birthday from the New Jersey State Museum!
Bring your child to the Planetarium for their birthday and receive a free gift! Just tell the box office when buying tickets and give them the birthday child’s first name. They will give your child the free gift and the Planetarium will announce the birthday before the show! If you call three or more business days in advance, the Planetarium will also add a banner to the dome to celebrate! To add the banner, contact William Murray at 609-826-3940 or William.murray@sos.nj.gov


Current Show Schedule

Virtual Planetarium Sky Views Talk of the Month

Planetarium
Sky Views December

Planetarium Programs

Season of Light

Season of Light

Suitable for general audiences.

Season of Light explores the reasons humans are so fascinated with lighting up our lives during the December holiday season. It's an exploration of the astronomical meanings behind seasonal traditions, including the "Star over Bethlehem". Season of Light is a specialty program with an emphasis on astronomical and cultural themes related to the holiday season. Its educational impact is achieved through a set of multidisciplinary ideas woven throughout the program that help relate different holiday traditions and astronomy to the lives of students, families, and the general public.

 

One World, One Sky

Recommended for ages 3-6 with adults.

One World, One Sky: Big Bird’s Adventure begins on Sesame Street when Elmo’s friend, Hu Hu Zhu, visits from China. Big Bird, Elmo and Hu Hu Zhu take viewers on an exciting discovery of the Sun, Moon, and stars. They also learn about the Big Dipper and the North Star. Elmo and Hu Hu Zhu then take an imaginary trip to the Moon where they learn that the moon is a very different place from the Earth. They even pick the North Star as their friendship star to always remind them of their shared joy of looking up at the sky together.

Teacher Guide: One World, One Sky

 

Exo: Are We Alone?

Humankind has always sought to understand the mysteries of the Universe and speculated about the possibility of extraterrestrial life. Today we know of thousands of exoplanets — planets located outside our Solar System — that offer valuable information about our own planet, its origins and life on Earth. We're on the cusp of making some fascinating discoveries. But how will they change our lives?

 

Climate Change

Suitable for all audiences.

Earth is the only world in the solar system where we know life exists. Countless species of plants and animals thrive on its surface and in its oceans. But Earth is changing. The atmosphere is losing its ability to regulate the comfortable temperatures that help life thrive. Things are warming up.

 

 

 

Astronaut Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, a native of Montclair, New Jersey, was the second man to stand on the surface of the moon. The visor in his helmet shows a reflection of Astronaut Neil Armstrong (first man on the moon) taking this picture, as well as one footpad of the Lunar Module Eagle and the United States flag planted next to it.

 


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